5 Flowers that Love the Heat


As you know, not all flowers are created equal. Some flowers prefer shady conditions and avoid the heat like a plague. And there is good reason to stay in the shade. Extreme heat can destroy your flowers and should be protected from the heat.

On the other hand, some like it HOT! In fact, the hotter, the better. There are flowers that thrive in the heat and aren’t afraid of extreme temperatures. And I’m not referring to those prickly desert plants. These are beautiful blooms that are colourful and bloom all summer long. So bring on heat!

Lantana Lantana Flower

  • Heat loving perennial
  • aromatic flower clusters are a mix of vibrant colours, ranging from yellow and pink, to red and orange, to white and lavender
  • attracts butterflies and hummingbirds to the garden
  • drought tolerant, heat tolerant and hardy
  • grows rapidly and could become invasive
  • berries are toxic

 

Oleander oleander

  • loves the sun
  • blooms from the middle of May to October
  • flowers can be pink, white, red or purple
  • requires minimal water and does best in sandy conditions
  • the leaves and flowers are poisonous to humans and animals

 

Vinca (Periwinkle)vinca (periwinkle)

  • heat and drought tolerant; perfect for hot and dry areas
  • easy to grow and maintain
  • this plant is grown for its attractive, glossy green foliage
  • flowers bloom all summer long; flower colours include white, pink and red
  • commonly used in garden borders, edging and grown cover
  • this plant is used in traditional herbal medicine

 

Mexican Sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia) mexican sunflower tithonia rotundifolia

  • like the name implies, it is native to Mexico and Central America
  • bright yellow-orange showy flowers attract butterflies and hummingbirds
  • thrive in dry conditions; does well with intense heat
  • highly resistant to diseases and pests
  • need plenty of room to grow in the garden
  • can be used in cut flower arrangements or used as a border plant in gardens

 

Zinniazinnia

  • this heat loving plant is native to Mexico and southern US
  • comes in all colours of the rainbow except blue
  • colourful flower attracts birds and insects; it’s a source of food for some birds
  • easy to grow and flowers bloom quickly
  •  can be used in gardens as edging, in window boxes, in rock gardens or as cut flowers

About Lesley Lowry

I love flowers! I enjoy growing them, learning about them and I love creating bouquets of freshly cut flowers. In our climate where it's winter most of the time, the growing season is way too short, so I have started this blog to get my fix all winter! I encourage you to post regularly on this blog, especially if you're lucky enough to live in a warm climate and can grow flowers all year long. I intend to post a lot of interesting facts and fun stuff about flowers, as well as info on many varieties of flowers.
This entry was posted in Flower Varieties, lantana, Mexican Sunflower, Oleander, Sunflowers, Vinca and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to 5 Flowers that Love the Heat

  1. Mona says:

    Thank you for this info. I will definitely add the zinnias & Mexican sunflowers. I won’t plant the Oleander because of its danger to my dog & grandkids. Although I’ve grown tired of lantana, it is a good strong plant that does well in my area.

    Like this

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