Christmas Greens


T’is the season for Christmas themed arrangements! The main difference between Christmas arrangements and “regular” ones are the greens that are used. Here is a list of great Christmas greens for all you DIY’ers out there.

  • Alpine Huck – has red branches that range from 65-75cm in length. This product requires at least two frosts to harden off and lose its foliage.
  • Cedar Incense – this Cedar is a lighter green than other cedars and has very fragrant yellow buds on the tips.
  • Cedar Port Orford – sometimes called flat cedar, it is dark green and very uniform in shape.
  • Cedar Western Red – a flat dark green cedar with reddish brown stems.
  • Cedar with Cones – a dark green cedar with several clusters of small brown cones on each bough.
  • Douglas Fir – has dark green soft needles and is the most fragrant of the firs.
  • Holly – very sensitive to temperature fluctuations; so much so that climate conditions affect the amount of berries each year. Very ethylene sensitive and exposure to ethylene can cause premature leaf and/or fruit fall.
  • Juniper – is coloured blue to blue/green with grayish blue berry clusters.
  • Mountain Hemlock – has dark green flat needles.
  • Noble Fir Boughs – consists of blue/green needles and has a strong fragrance, it’s the hardiest of all firs.
  • Pine Shore – has deep green, compact needles up to 4cm long.
  • Pine White – silvery green needles and has a pronounced pine smell.
  • Ponserosa Pine Cones – the pine cones are collected during the summer and stored until the Christmas season. They are anywhere from 6.2cm to 11cm in size.
  • Silver Fir – has deep emerald green needles with a silvery underside and is similar in structure to Noble Fir.
  • Ilex – the red berries are called “drupes”. These drupes are very appealing to birds, so growers must place nets over the crop to keep the birds off. Ilex verticillata is dioecious. This means that both male and female plants must be present to produce the berries, but the berries are only borne on female plants.
Alpine Huck

Alpine Huck

Cedar Incense

Cedar Incense

Cedar Port Orford

Cedar Port Orford

Cedar Western Red

Cedar Western Red

Cedar with Cones

Cedar with Cones

Douglas Fir

Douglas Fir

Holly

Holly

Juniper

Juniper

Mountain Hemlock

Mountain Hemlock

Noble Fir Boughs

Noble Fir Boughs

Pine Shore

Pine Shore

Pine White

Pine White

Ponderosa Pine Cones

Ponderosa Pine Cones

Silver Fir

Silver Fir

Ilex

Ilex

About Connor Lowry

I love flowers! I enjoy writing about them as well as gardening. Mostly I love finding new and unique flower gardening ideas I encourage you to post regularly on this blog, and send in guest blogs or ideas for new blogs as well. New and exciting blogs are always welcome I intend to post a lot of interesting facts and fun stuff about flowers, as well as info on many varieties of flowers.
This entry was posted in Christmas, Christmas Greens, Greens & Branches, Holidays and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Christmas Greens

  1. Ebony says:

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  2. Pingback: A Beginner’s Guide to Holiday Greenery | The Blog Farm - A Growing Blog Community

  3. Pingback: A Beginner’s Guide to Holiday Greenery | Grower Direct Fresh Cut Flowers Presents…

  4. Christine Harrison says:

    Free Rose Friday time! The scientific name for this plant is Lathyrus – what’s the common name? is sweet peas

    Like

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