How to Create Alcoholic Beverages from Roses


Commercial floral alcoholic drinks are pretty much obsolete now days but if you can get your hands on a cookbook or two that are really old, you’ll find some great recipes for making rose wine, rose liqueur, rose syrup and floral liqueurs using other flowers. For the purpose of this post we are going to stick to using roses.

Any roses that you are going to consume MUST be organic. Unfortunately you can’t stop in at a local florist to get the blooms you wish to cook with as these are most often treated with various pesticides. Instead just grow your own, this way you know exactly where they have been and what’s been on them!

For all the recipes below always pick the roses when they are in full bloom and be sure to remove the stems, leaves and stamens. Carefully rinse the petals and pat them dry.

Rosehip liquorBasic Rose Liqueur

  • 1 & 1/2 cups of fresh fragrant rose petals OR 1/3 cup of dried rose petals
  • 1 & 1/2 cups of vodka
  • 1/2 cup of sugar syrup

Steep your cleaned petals in the vodka for 2 to 3 weeks. Strain and squeeze out the juices. Add the sugar syrup and let mature for about a week.

Optional  – you can add some “extras” such as; lemon or orange peel, cherries, apple, pears, plums, peaches, raspberries, caraway or cardamom.

Usually vodka is about 80/proof but if yours is 100/proof increase the amount of sugar syrup by 1/8.

Here is how to make the sugar syrup:

  • 2 parts sugar
  • 1 part water

Bring to boil, stirring until all of the sugar has dissolved. Always cool it before adding to alcohol or it will evaporate.
The petals strained from the liqueur can be used for brewing tea.

Rose WineRose Petal Wine

  • 2 quarts of rose petals
  • 2 lbs of sugar
  • 1/2 pint white grape concentrate
  • Wine yeast – Champagne, Hock or Bordeaux
  • 1 gallon of water
  • Campden tablets (50 ppm. sulfite)
  • Additives for one gallon
    • 12 mg Benerva (Vitamin B1 Tablets)
    • 1 heaped tsp citric acid
    • 1/4 oz tartaric acid
    • 1/2 tsp grape tannin or tannic acid
    • 1tsp ammonium phosphate or 1 nutrient tablet
  • Advisable: 1 tsp pectinol or pectolase

Put rose petals in a plastic bucket with sugar, grape concentrate and additives. Pour on 6 pints of cold water. Stir thoroughly to dissolve sugar. Add on Campden tablet and cover. Leave for 24 hours.

After 24 hours add yeast, and ferment on the flowers for 4 days at a temperature of about 21ºC.

Strain the liquid into a gallon jar and fit a bored corek with an airlock plugged with cotton wool. Raise temperature, if possible, to 24ºC.

Ferment to dryness, i.e. the gravity should fall below the zero mark.

Rack into a fresh jar and if necessary, top up with water. Add one Campden tablet, fit a bored cork tightly plugged with cotton wool.

This wine becomes drinkable after a few weeks but as with all wine improves with maturing.

If red rose petals are used the final colour will be a light rose colour, you can add food colouring if desired. For a white wine use white or yellow petals.

Rose BrandyBrandy Rose Wine

  • 1/2 lb red rose petals
  • 1 pint of hot water
  • 1 lb of sugar
  • 1/2 pint of brandy

Mix the fragrant red rose petals with hot water and squeeze through a fine sieve. Add more petals until the liquid is a rech red colour and then stir in sugar and brandy. Bottle and serve as soon as you would like.

I hope you enjoy these recipes!
Have a great floral recipe you’d like to share? Post it in the comments below!

About Connor Lowry

I love flowers! I enjoy writing about them as well as gardening. Mostly I love finding new and unique flower gardening ideas I encourage you to post regularly on this blog, and send in guest blogs or ideas for new blogs as well. New and exciting blogs are always welcome I intend to post a lot of interesting facts and fun stuff about flowers, as well as info on many varieties of flowers.
This entry was posted in "Just The Facts", Cooking with Flowers, Fun Stuff, Holidays and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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